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Memorial 34 St Georges Church Carlisle WW1 Memorial

Welcome to the Carlisle and Stanwix Branch of The Royal British Legion

GRID REF: NY40373 55768  Postcode CA1 1EE

The War Memorial of St George's Presbyterian Church Carlisle, latterly the United Reformed Church, Warwick Road, Carlisle.

PLEASE NOTE that this building is no longer a church (The congregation meets in another location in the city). It is now commercial premises.  However the Memorial still occupies its original position just within the main entrance.

WE ARE ASSURED THAT THE MONUMENT WILL BE RETAINED AND TREATED WITH RESPECT.   It is accessible to the public during business hours.

 

 Memorial No 34 St Georges 26 09 2014 13 57 43

The names of the Fallen of the Great War are inscribed hereon. They are:-

SECOND LIEUTENANT JAMES DOUGLAS CARRICK of the Royal Field Artillery, (attached to the 42nd Trench Mortar Battery), service number 143513, was killed in action at Barastre in France on 11 September 1918. He is buried in the Honourable Artillery Company, Ecoust St Mein Cemetery, Pas de Calais. James Douglas Carrick was born in 1887 the younger son of James Carrick, a Glasgow merchant, and his wife Agnes. In March 1911, described as a tailor, he emigrated to Winnipeg, in Canada, for two years where, as well as carrying on business, he served as a volunteer in the 79th Cameron Highlanders. On his return to Britain he moved to Carlisle where he took over the management of the drapery and millinery business of William Watson Reid and in 1913 married Reid’s daughter Jessie. William Watson Reid, who was an elder in the WarwickRoadChurch, died in March 1915. It was, presumably, through his association with the Reid family that James Douglas Carrick became a member of the church. At the time of his enlistment, in 1916, he was Superintendent of the Sunday school and member of the Management Board of the Church.

SERGEANT MORTON HERBERT COOK of The Royal Air Force,service number 25222, died suddenly, of appendicitis, at Tidworth Military Hospital, Wiltshire, on 28 August 1918, aged 28 years, and is buried in Penton Mewsey (Holy Trinity) churchyard, Hampshire. He was the son of the late Mrs Cook of Holme Head Road and brother of Sergeant Jim and Jenny Cook [his sister in law] and George. He enlisted on 17 February 1916, was with the Royal Flying Corps in France in March 1917 and on 1 April 1918 he was transferred to the, newly formed, Royal Air Force and was appointed Sergeant on 17 July 1918. The person named to be informed of casualties was his sister in law Mrs Jane Cook of 3 Elm Terrace, Blackwell Road, Carlisle. Prior to enlisting he was a watchmaker by trade. His parents had been members of the Warwick Road Church. His service record is held by the National Archives.

PRIVATE FRED ALBERT COOPER, private 1st class, Royal Air Force, 45th Battalion Section, service number 75488, died on 6 July 1918, of wounds received on 5 July, at the age of 37 and was buried in the St Hilaire Cemetery Extension, Frevent, Pas de Calais. He was born in Reigate in 1881 the son of William Cooper, domestic gardener and his wife Sara. Sometime before the 1911 census, at which time he was working as a manager of a fruit and flower shop, Fred, his wife Nelly and their young family moved to Carlisle from Reigate and Redhill and became members of the Warwick Road Presbyterian Church on 28 July 1911. He enlisted on 11 April 1917. At the time of his death Fred, Nelly and his family were living at 24 Thornton Road, Stanwix; he is also commemorated on the War Memorial in StanwixCemetery. His service record is held in the National Archives.

PRIVATE ISAAC DAVIDSON of the 1st/5th Battalion Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, service number 301117, died of wounds at Newtown War Hospital, Carlisle, on 9th November 1918 at the age of 21, and was interred at Carlisle Dalston Road Cemetery. He was the son of Private John Davidson of the Royal Scottish Fusiliers, but lived with his grandmother Catherine, a boarding hose keeper, and Aunt Wilhelmina (Mina) at 15 Collingwood Street, Carlisle. Catherine and Wilhelmina were both members of the Warwick Road Church.

PRIVATE JAMES ELLIOT of B Company 11th Border Regiment, The Lonsdale Battalion, service number 15335, was killed in action in France and Flanders on 7 March 1916, aged 23, and is buried in Becourt Military Cemetery, Becordel-Becourt, the Somme. A graphic account of his death is given in a letter home from another soldier in the Lonsdale Battalion, which was reported in the Cumberland News of 18 March 1918. According the letter, under heavily shelling the trench, which James and two of his compatriots were in, collapsed and they were buried under the falling debris. Despite frantic digging they were only able to save one of them, the other two, James and Lance Corporal Cherry, died despite attempts at artificial respiration for 2½ hours.James who had enlisted on 22 October 1914, was the second son of William and Eliza Elliot of 6 Harvey Street, Carlisle. Before joining the Lonsdale Battalion he was employed as a baker at Teasdale’s factory. He was a close adherent of the Warwick Road Church where his parents were both members. Full details of his next of kin, including details of his marriage to Ellen Robinson, are given in the part burnt service record held by The National Archives. He is included on the family memorial in the Dalston Road cemetery.

PRIVATE JOHN ELLIOT of the 1st/5th Battalion Border Regiment, service number 40037, was killed in action in France and Flanders on 2 October 1918 and is buried at Bellicourt British Cemetery, Aisne, France.  John, who was born at Castleton, Roxburgh, otherwise Liddesdale, was 38 years old at the time of his death. He was the husband of Margaret Elliot, 18 Eden Street, Carlisle, and father of a young family. At the time of the 1911 census he was employed as a grocer’s assistant. Both he and Margaret were members of the Warwick Road Church.

PRIVATE SAMUEL RUTHERFORD GAMBLE signaller, 13th Battalion the Kings (Liverpool) Regiment, service number 57116, was listed as missing on 28 March 1918 and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial. He was formerly in the Lancashire Hussars and Yeomanry. Samuel, who was 19 at the time of his death, was born in Scotland, the son of Samuel, who was a commercial traveller and his wife Jemima [Mina]; at the time of his death the family were living at 16 Tullie Street, Carlisle. Before enlistment at Carlisle he was on the staff of the Carlisle Library. Samuel became a member of the Warwick Road Church in January 1915, where his father was an Elder and later Session Clerk. He is included on the family memorial in the Dalston Road cemetery.

PRIVATE JOHN WILLIAM GRAHAM 1st Battalion the Border Regiment, service number 242256, died of wounds at a clearing station abroad on 19th July 1918 and is buried in Longuenesse (St Omer) Louvenir Cemetery, Pas de Calais. John, who was 21 years old, was the son of Josephine Smith (formerly Graham) of 76 Corporation Road, Carlisle, and the late William Graham, Etterby, Stanwix. He is also remembered on the War Memorial in Stanwix Cemetery and the War Memorial of the Etterby Mission Hall of the Warwick Road Presbyterian Church, now in Cumbria’s Museum of Military Life, Carlisle.

PRIVATE THOMAS GRIERSON 2nd Battalion Welsh Regiment, service number 65380, died of wounds on 20th June 1918, as the consequence of the effect of mustard gas, and is buried in Pernes British Cemetery, Pas de Calais. Thomas, who was 19 years old at the time of his death, was the son of James Grierson of 8 Sybil Street, Carlisle. Thomas, who was born in Govan, Glasgow, originally joined the 74th Training Reserve Battalion in May 1917 was posted to the 234th Infantry Battalion on 20 August 1917, then to the 3rd Battalion of the Welsh Regiment in October 1917 and finally to the 2nd Battalion on 19 April 1918. Before joining the services Thomas was an engine cleaner. His parents James and Mrs Grierson came to Carlisle in late 1914 where they became members of the Warwick Road Church. The National Archives hold his full service record.

PRIVATE ROBERT TELFORD HOGG, MILITARY MEDAL 11th Battalion Border Regiment, service number 13746, was originally reported missing on 2 December 1917 and his death on that date was later confirmed. He is buried at Poelcapelle British Cemetery, Belgium. Robert, who was 25 years old, was born in Carlisle, the son of John Telford Hogg, a stationary engine man, and Barbara, of Thirlmere Street, Carlisle. Before joining the Lonsdale Battalion on 9 October 1914 he worked as a solicitor’s clerk at Wright Brown and Strong. His award of the Military Medal was listed in the supplement to the London Gazette of 26th May 1917. At the time of his death he was living with an aunt in Denton Street. His parents were both members of the Warwick Road Church. He is included on the family memorial in the Dalston Road cemetery. The National Archives holds his full service record.

PRIVATE ROBERT BLACK HOUSTON 1st Battalion Border Regiment, service number 27931, who was 36 years old, died, of wounds received in action, at Aberdeen Military Hospital on 11 December 1916 and is buried in Dalston Road Cemetery, Carlisle, where he is also commemorated on the family memorial stone. Robert was the son of Andrew Houston founder of the tailors, situated at the corner of Bank Street and Lowther Street, Carlisle, until a few years ago, and Barbara. At the time of the 1901 census he was living at home with his parents and siblings at 13 Spencer Street, Carlisle and working as a tailor’s cutter, presumably for his father, However, his whereabouts are not known from then until his marriage to Louisa Brewin in the district of Ecclesall Bierlow, Sheffield, early in 1915. Although he was born in Carlisle he enlisted in Glasgow. His father Andrew was an Elder in the WarwickRoadChurch for 35 years. It is noted that references to Robert in the Cumberland News of 2 December and 16 December, and on the family memorial in the Dalston Road Cemetery, describe his as a Lance Corporal.

PRIVATE RICHARD IVAN HUNTER 115th Company Machine Gun Corps (Infantry), service number 9851, who was 21 years old, was killed by shell-fire on 25 August 1917 and is buried at Poelcaple British Cemetery, Belgium. Richard, who was born in Carlisle, the younger son of John, a Carlisle chemist, and Ellen, of 177 Warwick Road, Carlisle, was educated at Grosvenor College, Carlisle. On 30 July 1913, described as a draughtsman, he departed from Liverpool to Montreal, Canada, from there he moved to Toronto where he was employed at the stained glass lead works of Robert McCausland Ltd. After the outbreak of war he returned home and enlisted with the Northumberland Fusiliers. He was severely wounded at the battle of Loos but returned to the front after recuperating. His parents, who were married in the Warwick Road Church, were both members of the Church.

PRIVATE DAVID KIRKWOOD 1st Battalion Worcestershire Regiment, service number 55187, died on 30 May 1918 and is buried at Vailly British Cemetery, Aisne, France. He was born in Beith on 4 October 1899 and was the son of William and Helen Kirkwood of 10 Graham Street, Carlisle. When he, originally, attempted to join the Border Regiment in June 1916 he falsely gave his date of birth as 4 July 1897 but was discharged because he was found to be under age. Prior to joining the Worcestershire Regiment he had served with the Kings Liverpool Regiment. Both his parents were members of the Warwick Road Presbyterian Church.

PRIVATE DAVID MACGREGOR 1st/5th Battalion Border Regiment, service number 2441197, was killed in action on 11 January 1917 at the age of 22 and is buried at the A. I. F. Burial Ground, Flers, Somme, France.  David, who was the eldest son of Joseph, an engine fitter for a biscuit manufacturer, and Rebecca Macgregor of 26 Morley Street, Carlisle, was a tin cutter at Hudson Scott and Sons Ltd. He enlisted in 1915 and was with the British Expeditionary Force in France from 14 May 1916 until his death. He was originally reported as missing from the 11 January 1917 but some months later, it was confirmed that he had been killed in action on that date. His sisters Louisa, who died in 1918, and Annie May were members of the Warwick Road Church. The National Archives holds his full service record.

PRIVATE THOMAS WILLIAM MOFFATT 4th Battalion Royal Fusiliers, service number 66478, formerly Border Regiment, service number, 25163, was killed in action on 27 September 1918, at the age of 27, and is buried in Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France. Thomas was born in Blackwell, Carlisle, the third son of the late George and Beatrice Moffatt of 16 Harrison Street, Carlisle. Beatrice and a number of his siblings were members of the Warwick Road Church.

SERGEANT WILLIAM MARTIN SMITH Royal Field Artillery, Territorial, service number 715105, was killed in action on 9 July 1918, at the age of 23 and is buried in Le Grand Hasard Military Cemetery, Morbecque, France. William, who enlisted in Carlisle, was born in Upperby, near Carlisle. He was the youngest son of John, a lithographers labourer and Mary Smith of 21 Regent Street, Blackwell Road, Carlisle and previously of 23 Clementina Terrace, Carlisle. His twin sisters Clara and Jenny were both members of the Warwick Road Church and he became a member by Profession of Faith on 27 October 1911.

PRIVATE JAMES TAIT 11th Battalion Border Regiment, service number 19463, was killed in action on 1 July 1916, at the age of 37, and is buried in the Lonsdale Cemetery Authuille, Somme, France. James Tait, who worked in the hotel trade, was born in Portobello near Edinburgh, and enlisted with the Lonsdale Battalion on 4 May 1915. He married Mary Hodgson at St John’s Church, Carlisle, on 24 December 1905 and left at least three young children. In the Cumberland News of 19 August 1916, much anxiety was expressed about his whereabouts because his widowed mother, Isabella, of 4 Lawson Street had not heard from him for some time. Confirmation of his death was not received until early January 1917. His mother and other family members were members of the Warwick Road Church. He is included on the family memorial in the Dalston Road cemetery.

PRIVATE JAMES BORRODAILE THOMPSON Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, service number 2670, was killed in action on 7 November 1916, at the age of 18, and is buried in Hubeterne Community Cemetery, Pas de Calais. He was the only son of Henry, a railway signalman, and Emma Thompson of 66 Trafalgar Street, Carlisle. James, who was an apprentice with C. Thurnam and Son, printers and stationers, English Street, Carlisle, had enlisted in 1914 at the age of 16. His parents were both members of the Warwick Road Church. He is included on the family memorial in the Dalston Road cemetery.

PRIVATE JAMES JARDINE WILSON 11th Battalion Border Regiment, service number 13324, was killed in action on 1 July 1916 and is listed on the Thiepval Memorial. James Jardine Wilson, who was born in Glasgow in 1894, enlisted in Carlisle on 28 September 1914. He was the son of Thomas, an engine driver, and Agnes Wilson of ‘Lochaber’, Newtown, Carlisle, and brother of Mary, Alison, Catherine, Margaret and Janet, his only brother, Archibald, having died in tragic circumstances.  Prior to enlisting with the Lonsdale Battalion, on 28 September 1914, he worked as a confectioner at Teasdale’s sweet factory where his uncle James Jardine was managing director. Soon after the 1 July 1916 he was reported as missing but his death was not confirmed until December 1916. James and James Tait [see above], both of the Lonsdale Battalion, were among those killed on the first day of the Battle of the Somme. His maternal grandfather, also James Jardine was an elder in the Warwick Road church and his uncle James, referred to above was both an Elder and Treasurer of the Church as well as being Superintendent of the Newtown Mission hall of the Church, now Newtown Methodist Church, for 46 years. His parents and sisters were also members and he had joined by Profession of Faith on 24 April 1914. He is included on the family memorial in the Dalston Road cemetery, Carlisle. The National Archives hold his service record.

 

With acknowledgement of the work of Mr Ian Moonie in researching and compiling this entry.

 

 

  

 

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